55 PADI Practise Open Water Diver Final Exam Answers

Last Updated on October 19, 2021 by Dan

Preparing for the PADI Open Water Diver Course

The PADI Open Water Diver (OWD) final exam consists of 50 questions, so we have included these practice questions (and answers) to help you study for this test. Most of the PADI Open Water Diver final exam questions are multiple-choice questions, along with a couple of ‘ place the answers in the correct order’ questions. You don’t have a time limit to complete the exam. In fact, you most likely have seen the questions in the review sections of your book in one form or another. All of the review sections in the book are extremely helpful when preparing to take the test, and there is no downside to doing them, right? If you are looking for PADI final exam answers you are in the right place. Don’t stress out as this test is designed for a 10-year-old to pass!

You need to answer questions about the basic principles of scuba diving, which shows that you know how to plan dives, choose the right scuba gear and understand underwater signals and diving procedures. You can learn this information in the PADI Open Water Diver Manual or by completing the PADI Open Water Diver eLearning course. Your instructor will demonstrate each skill for you and will get a chance to show you have learned the skills during your confined water dives. At the end of the course, you will take the final exam.

Download a formatted copy of these questions and our exam preparation guide and print it out in preparation for your test for $8

55 Practise Open Water Diver Final Exam Questions

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Tips From An Experienced Instructor

Hi there! I’m Mary, and I have been a PADI Open Water Scuba Instructor and Master Scuba Diving Trainer for over 10 years. This means I have collected a fair amount of experience in teaching and examining Open Water Diver courses, and I want to share some tips with you. This way, you might find a few pointers to help you successfully completing your license and becoming a certified diver!

                  The Open Water Diver course consists of 3 major parts: theory, confined water, and open water dives. All parts must be successfully completed in order to obtain the most sought-after dive certification worldwide. Therefore, being great at theory and not so confident in water, or vice versa, is not a good start to your life as a diver.

                  Too many times I have seen students failing their theory exam, thinking the only one that matters is the practical part, intoxicated by the idea of swimming next to a shark or visiting a shipwreck. Remember, no good diver should ever ignore the basic rules of physics and physiology that your OWD course taught you!

                  Another important skill to master, definitely underrated, is the care of the equipment. In my experience as a dive guide, I have encountered certified divers that had no idea how to set up their own gear, because their instructor never taught them and they always did it for them. Wow! Learning how to set up and maintain your equipment, including after-dive care, is such an important skill that many diving agencies specify a minimum number of times you are required to perform this skill throughout your course. Would you buy a car, without knowing how to open the trunk or changing a light?

                  Moving on to the underwater skills, there is one particular exercise that often represents a huge obstacle for dive students: the dreaded mask removal skill! If there is one single skill that I have witnessed pushing students to quit, even those that brilliantly succeeded in all other parts of the course, this is the one. The fear and discomfort given by water in our eyes and nose becomes, for some, unbearable; however, my suggestion is to keep in mind one single concept: why do we learn this skill? Wouldn’t it be worse to find yourself completely unprepared, 18 meters or 60 feet underwater, with a broken, lost or misplaced mask, and not knowing how to react to it? Take it as a survival skill, because that’s what it truly is.

                  I’d like to conclude this little list of tips focusing on the importance of buoyancy underwater. This is in fact a skill that requires time, practice and focus, not one you’ll likely master in just four or five dives. A good instructor will be able to point out a few specific tips for every student, and the PADI Peak Performance Buoyancy Specialty is highly recommended at this level: it will give you extra knowledge and confidence under water, which eventually translates in a more enjoyable dive, better air consumption and even improved photographic skills!

Online PADI Open Water Diver Course

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Find out about the PADI Open Water Diver Course Online here

 

55 Practise Q & A for the Final Exam

Here are some practice questions and answers to help you along:

Question 1

  1. An object which is naturally buoyant in fresh water would _____________ if the object is placed into saltwater.
    (Naturally buoyant – does not sink or float).
    Sink
    b. Either sink or float
    c. Do nothing
    d. Float

    Answer: d – Float
    Saltwater is more dense than fresh water because it contains more dissolved minerals in it. density causes more of an upward force (buoyancy) on an object the thus, causing the object which is naturally buoyant in fresh water to float in salt water.
    Refer: Being a diver I – Buoyancy and controlling buoyancy

  2. If you take a fully blown balloon to the bottom of the swimming pool. What will happen to the balloon and the air inside it?
    The balloon will get bigger in size and the air inside will become less dense as gas molecules move further apart
    b. The balloon will get smaller in size and the air inside will become less dense as gas molecules move further apart
    c. The balloon will get bigger in size and the air inside will become denser as gas molecules move close together
    d. The balloon will get smaller in size and the air inside will become denser as gas molecules move close together

    Answer: d – the balloon will get smaller in size and the air inside will become more dense as gas molecules move close together
    As water pressure increases the deeper you go, the volume of an air space will reduce causing the density of the gas molecules inside the balloon to move closer together. The balloon (volume of an air space) will get smaller and air density inside the balloon would increase.
    Refer: Being a Diver I – Water pressure and air volume effects

  3. If you turn a glass upside down trapping air within it by putting it in water and take the glass 10 meters underwater. The air space within the glass would:
    Become half the size it was on the surface
    b. Become two-thirds the size it was on the surface
    c. become one-thirds the size it was on the surface
    d. Not change in size

    Answer: a – Become half the size it was on the surface
    At 10 meters, the pressure is 2 bar. An air volume taken to this depth from the surface would decrease and become half the size.
    Refer: Being a diver I – Water pressure and air volume effects

  4. If you fail to equalise your body air space, it may be due to:
    Sea sickness
    b. Hypertension and heart diseases
    c. Ear, nose or throat medical problem such as a cold or allergies
    d. Anxiety and panic state

    Answer: c – ear, nose or throat medical problem such as a cold or allergies.
    Congestion in ears, nose or throat which can block the air passages making equalisation difficult.
    Refer: Being a Diver I – The Effects of Increasing Pressure on Body Air Spaces.

  5. When descending and your ears or sinuses begin to hurt, it usually means that:
    I have equalised my body air spaces
    b. The mask strap is extremely tight
    c. My mask is too small
    d. I am experiencing a squeeze and need to equalise

    Answer: d – I am experiencing a squeeze and need to equalise
    Pain in your ears or sinuses usually means that they have not been equalised. You are required to halt your descent, ascend slowly and relieve the pressure in your ears or sinuses. After relieving pressure, attempt to re-equalise. You are required to end the dive if you fail to equalise.
    Refer: Being a Diver I – The Effects of Increasing Pressure on Body Air Spaces

  6. What is the best position for you to alternate air source?
    Loose by your side, so you can find it fast
    b. The triangle area formed by your chin and lower corners of the rib cage
    c. To the base of your cylinder
    d. In the back of your BCD between the shoulder blades and waist

    Answer: b – The triangle area formed by your chin and lower corners of the rib cage.
    The alternate air source attaches with a quick release in the triangle area formed by your chin and lower corners of the rib cage. It is important to avoid letting the alternate air source dangle unsecured from your kit.
    Refer: Equipment I – Regulators.

  7. Common cause of lung overexpansion
    Scuba diving without a partner
    b. Continuing diving when not properly weighed
    c. Being dehydrated before scuba diving
    d. Holding your breath while scuba diving

    Answer: d – Holding your breath while scuba diving
    Holding your breath and blocking off your lungs could be fatal. When ascending it could cause the lungs to overexpand which may lead to rupture resulting into paralysis and death. Breathing ceaselessly and continuously while scuba diving keeps the body air passages open allowing the expanding air to escape.
    Refer: Being a Diver I – The Effects of Decreasing Pressure on Body Air Spaces.

  8. A cylinder of air which lasts 60 minutes for normal surface breathing; assuming same factors, how long would the same cylinder of air last at 20 meters underwater breathing normally?
    12minutes
    b. 15minutes
    c. 20minutes
    d. 60minutes

    Answer: c – 20minutes
    For every 10 meters underwater, there is an increase of 1 atmosphere of pressure (atm) to the standard 1atm at surface level. Thus, 20meters underwater is 2atm + 1atm of surface level = 3atm.

     

  9. Recommended visual inspection of your scuba cylinder should be?
    Every six months
    b. Once a year
    c. Once every two years
    d. Every five years

    Answer: b – once a year
    Annual visual inspection is recommended to check for internal corrosion, contamination, or damage
    Refer: Cylinders.

  10. The DIN valves:
    Are made of durable plastic
    b. Contain a spring-operated shut-off valve which is held open by cylinder pressure
    c. Has an o-ring within
    d. Contain threaded openings to screw the regulators into

    Answer: d – contain threated opening to screw the regulators into.
    The regulators with the DIN system screw into the valve, contrary to the yoke system which holds the regulator first stage to the cylinder with a clamp.
    Refer: Equipment I – Cylinders.

  11. __________________ is part of proper care for your scuba cylinders?
    Sand it and repaint it every year
    b. Dry it in the sun regularly
    c. Keep some air within
    d. Have pressure tests every month

    Answer: c – Keep some air within
    To prevent moisture build up which causes corrosion, it is important to keep some air within the cylinder. It is important to have annual visual inspection and to have pressure tests at regular intervals of two-to-five years. Store the cylinder in an upright position in a safe place, away from intense heat.
    Refer: Equipment I – Cylinder Care.

  12. Referring to the picture below, each regulator part has been numbered. Please choose the correct choices for the numbered regulator part. Diving regulator
    a. Regulator first stage
    b. Regulator second stage
    c. Alternate air source second stage
    d. Low pressure inflator hose for the BCD. e. Instrument console/gauge/computer

     

    Answer:
    1 – a: regulator first stage
    2 – b: regulator second stage
    3 – c: alternate air source second stage
    4 – e: instrument console/gauge/computer
    5 – d: low pressure inflator hose for the BCD
    Refer: Equipment I – Regulators.

  13. Looking at objects underwater have an illusion of seeming ___________________ than looking on the surface.
    Larger, nearer
    b. Larger, farther away
    c. Smaller, nearer
    d. Smaller, farther away

    Answer: a – larger, nearer.
    Light refracts when travelling through the water and into the mask making an illusion of objects appearing larger and nearer than actuality.
    Refer: Being a Diver II – Seeing and Hearing as a Diver.

  14. What travels faster in water than air?
    Hint: it is why you cannot easily tell the source.
    Sound
    b. Aquatic life
    c. Current
    d. Light

    Answer: a – sound.
    Sound travels faster in water than in air making it difficult to determine the source of sound.
    Refer: Being a Diver II – Hearing Underwater.

  15. What is the recommended stay distance of your dive flag?
    5meters
    b. 15meters
    c. 30meters
    d. 60meters

    Answer: b – 15 minutes.
    There are no specific local laws regarding dive flags stay distance, however, stay within 15meters of the flag unless other laws that specify.
    Refer: Equipment III – Dive Flags.

  16. If it difficult and tough breathing underwater, you should:
    Inflate the BCD
    b. Stop all activity and rest, holding onto something for support if available and possible
    c. Swim to your partner and signal for help
    d. Execute a controlled swimming ascent [CESA: swimming to the surface saying the ah-h-h-h sound]

    Answer: b – stop all activity and rest, holding onto something for support if available and possible
    When you are overexerted, you find it difficult and tough to breath underwater. It is important to immediately stop all activity and rest while holding onto something for support to restore normal breathing. Only continue after you have restored normal, slow paced breathing rate.
    Refer: Being a Diver II – Overexertion.

  17. When descending, the wet suit will:
    Compress from water pressure and you will lose buoyancy and warmth
    b. Expand from water pressure and you will lose buoyancy and warmth
    c. Compress from water pressure and you will gain buoyancy and warmth
    d. There will be no change in thickness, with no change in buoyancy and warmth

    Answer: a – compress from water pressure and you will lose buoyancy and warmth.
    Small air traps in your wet suit will compress the deeper you descend causing your buoyancy to decrease and affecting the warmth. To control your buoyancy, add small amounts of air to your BCD frequently during the descent.
    Refer: Being a Diver II – Descents in Open Water.

  18. You are properly weighted for diving if you:
    Float at neck level with BCD approximately half full while holding a normal breath of air
    b. Sink slowly with empty BCD while holding a normal breath of air
    c. Float at eye level with empty BCD while holding a normal breath of air
    d. Sink easily with BCD approximately half full

    Answer: Float at eye level with empty BCD while holding a normal breath of air.
    Having a good buoyancy and trim is having the right amount of weight. Thus, when you exhale, you should be able to slowly sink.
    Refer: Your Skills as a Diver II – Weight Check and Proper Weighting.


  19. Choose the best answer for the signal shown below.
    Stop, hold, stay there
    b. Go back
    c. Please be quiet
    d. Ascend or go up

    Answer: a – stop, hold, stay there
    Refer: Your Skills as a Diver I – Hand Signals.

  20. Choose the best answer for the signal shown below.
    Which way is the right way
    b. Something is wrong, not okay
    c. Ascend
    d. Everything is okay

    Answer: b – something is wrong, not okay
    Refer: Your Skills as a Diver I – Hand Signals.

  21. If you get separated from your buddy, the general protocol is to:
    Ascend immediately, wait a minute and then go back underwater
    b. Search for your buddy for a minute, then go up to reunite with your buddy at the surface
    c. Go to the surface immediately and get out of the water
    d. Look for your buddy’s bubbles and follow to find your buddy

    Answer: b – search for your buddy for a minute, then go up to reunite with your buddy at the surface
    These general procedures should be adhered to when experiencing buddy separation.
    Refer: Being a Diver II – The Buddy System.

  22. You are most likely to become confused about the direction of up or down in ________________________.
    Midwater
    b. Surface
    c. Bottom
    d. Near surface

    Answer: a – midwater
    During descent and ascent in reduced visibility, the diver may feel disoriented particularly in midwaters.
    Refer: Being a Diver III – Visibility.

  23. When there is a mild current at the beginning of your dive. How should you begin the dive?
    Dive with current
    b. Diver across current
    c. Dive against or into current
    d. Dive at an angle to current

    Answer: c – dive against or into current
    By swimming into current for the first part of your dive, the current will carry you back to where you started during the second part.
    Refer: Being a Diver III – Water Movement.

  24. Underwater contents of the bottom can cause changes in:
    Visibility (see far underwater)
    b. Temperature (warmth underwater)
    c. Current (movement of water)
    d. Buoyancy (sink or float underwater)

    Answer: a – visibility (see far underwater)
    Visibility is affected by contents of water: nature and composition of particles present. Large, heavy particles (rocks or gravel) settle relatively quicker than small, light particles (clay or mud) which can remain suspended for long periods of time.
    Refer: Being a Diver III – Visibility.

  25. Aquatic life related injuries occur because the animals are ________________________.
    Hungry
    b. Curious
    c. Injured
    d. Defend mode

    Answer: d – defend mode.
    A large portion of aquatic life related injured are a result of defensive actions by the animals. Generally, such injuries are avoided by being mindful, aware, and respectful of the aquatic animals.
    Refer: Being a Diver III – Aquatic Life.

  26. Diver at the surface is moving quickly with jerk movements, has the mask off the face, regulator/snorkel out of the mouth and does not respond to directions. The diver is:
    Diver practising okay signal
    b. Performing predictive safety checks
    c. Excited and overwhelmed with the dive
    d. Showing signs of distress and troubled

    Answer: d – showing signs of distress and troubled
    Divers who are distressed and troubled often will have the mask of their foreheads and regulator/snorkel out of the mouth, not using breathing equipment. Divers often present with wide unseeing eyes, quick jerky movements, who don’t follow instructions. These divers require immediate help as they may continue to struggle in distress until exhaustion.
    Refer: Being a Diver III – Surface Problem Management – Responsive Diver.

  27. You are close to your diving buddy and midway realise that you are out of air. The most appropriate response is to:
    Switch to your buddy’s alternate air source
    b. Conduct a CESA [Controlled Emergency Swimming Ascent – swimming up to the surface making a continuous sound like ah-h-h]
    c. Make a buoyancy emergency ascend by dropping all the weight system
    d. Switch to your buddy’s alternate air source and continue with the dive

    Answer: a – switch to your buddy’s alternate air source
    When you are out of air, it is best to make an alternate air source ascent using your buddy’s alternate air source
    Refer: Being a Diver III – Underwater Problem Management.

  28. When your regulator begins to free flow whilst underwater, you should:
    Conduct a CESA [Controlled Emergency Swimming Ascent – swimming up to the surface making a continuous sound like ah-h-h]
    b. Do nothing
    c. Hold the regulator without sealing mouth around mouthpiece and ‘sip’ air needed to ascend
    d. Execute a buoyant emergency ascent

    Answer: c – Hold the regulator without sealing mouth around mouthpiece and ‘sip’ air needed to ascend
    You can breath from a free-flowing regulator by ‘sipping’ the air as you need it. Do not seal your moth around mouthpiece. Initiate ascent as the free-flow will exhaust the air supply quickly.
    Refer: Being a Diver III – Underwater Problem Management.

  29. In a hypothetical scenario, on a dive you fail to watch your SPG and run out of air. If your buddy if close by your best option is to ______________________________________. Alternatively, you can ________________________________________, if you are in shallow water and the surface is close than your buddy.
    Ascend using your buddy’s alternate source of air/ make a CESA
    b. Ascend using your buddy’s alternate source of air/ make a buoyant emergency ascend
    c. Make a normal ascend/ ascend using your buddy’s alternate source of air
    d. Make a CESA/ make a normal ascend

    Answer: a – Ascend using your buddy’s alternate source of air/ make a CESA
    When you are out of air, your best option is to make an ascend using your buddy’s alternate source of air. Conducting a CESA where it is fairly shallow with the surface is close than your buddy.
    Refer: Being a Diver III – Underwater Problem Management.

  30. When a diver is injured who is out of the water and is non-responsive to touch or sound. The first, most appropriate thing to do would be:
    To check if diver is breathing
    b. To keep diver warm
    c. To decide the causative event
    d. To provide oxygen

    Answer: To check if diver is breathing
    Your highest priority to the diver who is unresponsive to touch, or sound is to make sure the diver is breathing. Provide rescue breath when necessary and immediate contact emergency medical care.
    Refer: Being a Diver III – First Responder Care for Diving-Related Emergencies.

  31. Fill the cylinders at known and reliable dive centre and make sure not to use air that tastes or smells bad, nor use air from compressor designed to fill car tires. The main objective of this practice is to:
    Decrease likelihood of gas narcosis
    b. Decrease risk of lung overexpansion injuries
    c. Decrease risk of breathing contaminated air
    d. Increase the diving experience

    Answer: c – decrease risk of breathing contaminated air
    Contaminated air is rare because it is an avoided circumstance by filling the cylinders at reliable and reputable scuba air sources. Professional dive operational resorts take care of their fill system and understand the value of regular air testing
    Refer: Being a Diver IV – Contaminated Air.

  32. Divers who tend to act foolishly at depth mainly due to gas narcosis begin to act normally again if they:
    Ascend to a shallower depth
    b. Regulate their breathing
    c. Signal buddy for help
    d. Dive within no stop limits

    Answer: a – ascend to a shallower depth
    Divers who experience gas narcosis should immediately ascend to a shallower depth. Gas narcosis generally fades quickly when you ascend to a shallower depth
    Refer: Being a Diver V – Gas Narcosis.

  33. Increase probability for risk of decompression sickness (DCS) if:
    Dive in poor visibility, strong current water, and rough seas
    b. Dive while cold, sick, mentally exhausted, thirsty, or injured
    c. Do not look after my equipment
    d. Using a dive computer

    Answer: b – dive while cold, sick, mentally exhausted, thirsty, or injured
    Secondary factors which can contribute to developing decompression sickness include fatigue, dehydration, high body fat, injuries, mental exhaustion, age, poor fitness, alcohol consumption before or after dive, high intensity exercise before, during, after a dive.
    Refer: Being a Diver IV – Decompression Sickness.

  34. When experiencing decompression sickness (DCS) it is recommended to:
    Stop diving until you recover and feel better
    b. Go back in the water
    c. Breath 100% oxygen and immediately contact emergency medical care
    d. See a doctor when you are free

    Answer: c – breath 100% oxygen and immediately contact emergency medical care
    For a suspected case of DSC illness, contact emergency medical care. You should lie down and breath emergency oxygen. It is estimated that almost all cases of decompression illness require recompression chamber treatment and management.
    Refer: Using Dive Computers and Tables II – First Aid Treatment for Decompression Illness.

  35. The first step in using the dive computer is to ___________________
    Configure the time and date
    b. Read manufacturer’s instruction manual
    c. Calibrate for enriched air nitrox
    d. Configure for fresh or salty water dives

    Answer: b – read manufacturer’s instruction manual
    It is the diver’s responsibility to read and understand the manufacturer’s instruction manual for the dive computer in order to use it effectively.
    Refer: Using Dive Computers and Tables I – Planning Dives with Your Computer.

  36. Planning a dive with a dive computer; use the ‘plan’ or ‘no stop scroll’ mode to determine which of the following:
    Maximum depth of previous dive
    b. Maximum allowed time limits for depth (approximately in 3meters)
    c. Whether your dive computer is compatible with your buddy’s dive computer
    d. To ensure perfect settings for backup computer

    Answer: b – maximum allowed time limits for depth (approximately in 3meters)
    With most dive computers, you scroll depths in 3meters increments, displaying maximum time allowed per depth. Thus, you plan dives with your dive computer by activating it and scrolling the no stop limits.
    Refer: Using Dive Computers and Tables I – Planning Dives with Your Computer.

  37. During a computer assisted dive:
    Each diver requires a personal computer
    b. Each buddy requires a personal computer
    c. Up to four divers may share a computer
    d. All divers may follow the dive guide’s computer

    Answer: a – each diver requires a personal computer
    Each diver requires a computer in a computer assisted dive and the buddy team should follow the most conservative computer to turn or end a dive.
    Refer: Using Dive Computers and Tables I – Diving with Your Computer.

  38. You should not turn off a dive computer between dives because:
    The dive master may refuse or object because you cannot recall the dive information for logging
    b. The dive computer would lose memory of previous dive and not calculate repetitive dives accurately
    c. It may not switch on or may take a long to switch on
    d. Doing so is strenuous for the batteries and may cause the dive computer to malfunction

    Answer: b – the dive computer would lose memory of previous dive and not calculate repetitive dives accurately
    The dive computer tracks personal theoretical nitrogen levels continuously during all the dives and surface intervals. For the diver’s safety, to track and record an accurate account, the diver must not turn off their computer and need to use the same computer for the entire diving day on all dives.
    Refer: Using Dive Computers and Tables I – Repetitive Diving.

  39. If the diver accidentally exceeds the computer’s ‘no stop limits’, the diver should:
    Make a safety stop for 3minutes at 5meters
    b. Follow the computer’s instructions for decompression
    c. Surface immediately, breath oxygen and report the incident to the dive master
    d. Make a controlled ascend and refer to manufacturer’s instruction for decompression procedures

    Answer: b – follow the computer’s instructions for decompression
    If and when the diver exceeds the ‘no stop limit’, they shall have to make an emergency decompression stop. The dive computer will go into the decompression mode and guide the diver by providing the depth of emergency decompression stop and how long you have to stay before you can ascend to surface. Emergency decompression stops are required so that the diver does not exceed the theoretical nitrogen levels.
    Refer: Using Dive Computers and Tables II – Emergency Decompression Stops.

  40. If the diver is diving in cold water or under strenuous situational conditions, the diver should:
    Add extra safety margin and stay well within the computer’s limits
    b. Stay longer because nitrogen absorption will be slower
    c. Continue as the dive computer will probably not work at all
    d. Not do anything special

    Answer: a – add extra safety margin and stay well within the computer’s limits
    If the diver gets cold or exercises a lot during a dive, they may have more dissolved nitrogen than calculated by the dive computer. High levels of dissolved nitrogen increase risk of decompression sickness (DCS) risk.
    Refer: Using Dive Computers and Tables II – Cold and Strenuous Dives.

  41. If a diver’s computer fails during a dive, they can use the backup computer to continue with the dive. If the diver is not wearing a backup dive computer, the diver should:
    Ascend, make a safety stop and end the dive
    b. Borrow the buddy’s backup dive computer
    c. Continue with the dive until low on air but do not make any repetitive dives
    d. End the dive and surface immediately

    Answer: a – ascend, make a safety stop and end the dive
    The procedure for a failed dive computer is to signal your buddy, ascend, make a safety stop and end your dive. You cannot continue the dive without being able to track your dive profile.
    Refer: Using Dive Computers and Tables I – Diving with Your Computer.

  42. If a diver makes two dives in one day and is flying home on a commercial plane. How long should I wait until I can fly:
    0hours
    b. 18hours
    c. 24hours
    d. 48hours

    Answer: b – 18hours
    It is recommended to have a minimum pre-flight surface interval of 18hours for repetitive dives or multiday dives.
    Refer: Using Dive Computers and Tables II – Flying After Diving and Altitude Diving.

  43. As a new PADI Open Water Diver, the recommended maximum depth is ________________, compared to the maximum depth of all recreational scuba divers or experienced diver is _______________.
    10meters/ 18meters
    b. 12meters/ 30meters
    c. 18meters/ 40meters
    d/ 24meters/ 58meters

    Answer: a – 10meters/ 18meters
    Refer: Being a Diver V – Continuing Your Adventure.

  44. When diving at an altitude of above 300meters, the diver:
    Does not need to follow special procedures or protocols
    b. Cannot use their dive computer
    c. Does not need to follow special procedures instead need to set the computer for the altitude
    d. Needs to follow special procedures and may need to set the computer for the altitude

    Answer: d – needs to follow special procedures and may need to set the computer for the altitude
    Normally you surface to lower atmospheric pressure, if diving at an altitude of 300meters of higher you need to use altitude diving procedures. Most of the dive computers automatically adjust to the altitude and have optional settings you can adjust for altitude diving.
    Refer: Using Dive Computers and Tables II – Flying After Diving and Altitude Diving.

  45. Case scenario: if you dive to 18meters for 33minutes, have a 30minutes surface interval and plan to dive to 17meters. What is the maximum allowed time for the second dive?
    19minutes
    b. 21minutes
    c. 23minutes
    d. 32minutes

    Answer: d – 32minutes
    RDP Table 1: find depth on the top most row, following the column down to the time or next great time, going across to find the pressure group: 18meters to 34/33minutes àpressure group M
    RDP Table 2: Follow the pressure group M to find 30minutes (between 26-32minutes) and follow the column down to pressure group H
    RDP Table 3: Follow the next deepest depth of 18meters, going across to meet group H. The number in the blue box is 32minutes which is the allowed bottom time.
    Refer: RDP/eRDPML Instructions for Use booklet.

  46. Case scenario: if you plan to make two dives: 1st dive to 18meters for 49minutes and 2nd dive to 18meters of 24minutes. What is the minimum surface intervals between these two dives safely?
    26minutes
    b. 32minutes
    c. 54minutes
    d. 59minutes

    Answer: b – 32minutes
    RDP Table 1: find depth on the top most row, following the column down to the time or next great time, going across to find the pressure group: 18meters to 51/49minutes àpressure group T
    RDP Table 3: Follow the next deepest depth of 18meters, going across until you find a time in the blue box. The number in the blue box is 24minutes, following this to pressure group L.
    RDP Table 2: Follow the L column from the bottom until it meets the T row, showing the minimum surface interval is 32minutes. Refer: RDP/eRDPML Instructions for Use booklet.

  47. Case scenario: if you dive to 17meters for 47minutes, have a 30minutes surface interval and do a second dive to 17meters. Losing track of time, you notice my bottom time is now 25minutes. According to the general rules what should you do?
    Ascend immediately to 5meters and stay there for at least 8minutes before going to surface. You should not dive for 6hours
    b. Go to the surface immediately and contact the nearest recompression chamber
    c. Ascend immediately to 5meters and stay there for at least 3minutes before going to surface. You should not dive for 2hours
    d. Ascend immediately to 3meters and stay there until you use up your air. You should not dive for 24hours

    Answer: a – ascend immediately to 5meters and stay there for at least 8minutes before going to surface. You should not dive for 6hours
    RDP Table 1: find the next greatest depth on top row, follow the column down to next greatest time and across to find pressure group. 18meters to 48/47minutes à pressure group S.
    RDP Table 2: Follow pressure group S to find 30minutes (between 28-32minutes) and follow column down to pressure group L.
    RDP Table 3: follow the next greatest depth of 18meters going across to meet L. The number in the blue box is 24 – is allowed bottom time.
    Refer: RDP/eRDPML Instructions for Use booklet.

  48. Case scenario: a group of advanced Open Water Divers plans to make two dives. The 1st dive is on a reef in 22meters of water for 20minutes. The group has an surface interval of 1hour then have a 2nd dive is on s wreck in 18meters of water with a planned bottom time for 30minutes.
    L
    b. K
    c. S
    d. R

    Answer: d – R
    RDP Table 1: find depth on the top most row, following the column down to the time or next great time, going across to find the pressure group: 22meters to 21minutes àpressure group I/K
    RDP Table 2: Follow the pressure group to find 1hour and follow the column down to pressure group C
    RDP Table 3: Follow the group C to next deepest depth of 18meters. The number in the white box is 15/14 – is the residual nitrogen time. Add this time to the bottom time: 15/14 + 30minutes = 45/44minutes
    RDP Table 1: follow the 18meters coloumn down to the time or next greatest time: pressure group R.
    Refer: RDP/eRDPML Instructions for Use booklet.

  49. Case scenario: you and your buddy are planning to dive at a site where the water and air temperatures are near to freezing. We plan to dive to 18meters for 30minutes. What dive profile would you use when planning our dive?
    24meters for 40minutes
    b. 22meters for 30minutes
    c. 20 meters for 40minutes
    d. 18meters for 30minutes

    Answer: b – 22meters for 30minutes
    Available on the RDP Table: if you are planning a dive in cold water or under conditions that might be strenuous, plan the dive assuming the depth is 4 meters deeper than actual.
    Refer: RDP/eRDPML Instructions for Use booklet.

  50. Case scenario: You are an Advanced Open Water Diver and plan to do 3dives. The 1st dive is 25meters for 22minutes followed by a 52minutes surface interval. The 2nd dive is 20meters for 27minutes followed by a 62minutes surface interval. The 3rd dive is to 18meters – what would be the maximum allowable bottom time for the 3rd dive?
    21minutes
    b. 25minutes
    c. 34minutes
    d. 54minutes

    Answer: c – 34minutes
    RDP Table 1: find the next greatest depth on top row, follow the column down to next greatest time and across to find pressure group. 25meters to 22minutes à pressure group L.
    RDP Table 2: Follow pressure group to find and follow column down to pressure group D.
    RDP Table 3: follow D down to meet 20meters. The number in the white box is 15/13 – is the residual nitrogen time.
    Add this time to the bottom time: 15/13 + 27minutes = 42/40minutes 
    Refer: RDP/eRDPML Instructions for Use booklet.

See the RDP/eRDPML Instructions for Use booklet.

 

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  • The PADI Open Water Diver (OWD) final exam consists of 50 questions, so we have included these practice questions (and answers) to help you study for this test. We include things to know before you take the test, tips from an experienced instructor, trick for taking the exam, what is a RDP and 57 practise questions.

For more articles on the PADI Open Water Exam read 12 Ways to Fail Your PADI Open Water Exam

 

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55 PADI Practise Open Water Diver Final Exam Answers
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55 PADI Practise Open Water Diver Final Exam Answers
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The PADI Open Water Diver final exam consists of 50 questions, and we have included a few practise questions (with their answers) to help you study. You can print these Q&As to help you get a better mark for your exam.
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